Category : Events

Tennis Australia named one of Australia’s most LGBTIQ+ inclusive sporting organisations

Originally published by Star Observer , 13 June 2019

 

Tennis Australia has been named one of Australia’s best sporting organisations for LGBTIQ+ inclusion at the recent Pride in Sport Awards in Melbourne.

The awards, which recognise exceptional efforts in making sport more inclusive for LGBTIQ+ people, were launched last year and are the first of their kind in Australia.

This year, the top award was given to both Tennis Australia and Melbourne University Sport. Cricket Victoria was recognised as the Highest Ranking State Sporting Organisation, while the St Kilda Football Club took home the award for the Highest Ranking Professional Club.

The awards showcase the result of the Pride in Sport Index (PSI), a national benchmarking instrument used to assess LGBTIQ+ inclusion within Australian sport.

ACON Vice-President and Co-Founder of the PSI, Andrew Purchas, said the past year had highlighted the continued struggles facing LGBTIQ+ people in sport.

“These awards and the index continue to highlight the important inclusion work being done by many within Australian sport, as they provide sporting organisations and figures with an opportunity to reflect on their work in the inclusion of LGBTIQ+ participants and staff, and identify areas they can address to ensure their sport is truly inclusive,” he said.

“Many of Australia’s sporting organisations are taking the positive steps needed to be taken to ensure your sexuality, gender identity and experience does not impact your ability to play, watch or be involved with sport at any level.

“I congratulate all the award recipients and the many others working towards making Australian sport an inclusive place for everyone and I’m proud to celebrate those success stories at the Pride in Sport Awards today.”

The awards were hosted by NITV presenter and former Star Observer cover star Matty Webb, and featured a host of leading and sporting community figures, including a keynote address from Matt Cecchin, the first openly gay NRL referee.

This year’s PSI results saw a 61 per cent increase in index submissions, highlighting the focus sporting groups are beginning to put on LGBTIQ+ inclusion.

Award nominations from the wider community also rose by 70 per cent.

Program Manager for Pride in Sport, Beau Newell, said the index had continued to see a significant shift in practice with LGBTIQ+ inclusion work in Australian sport.

“With a wide range of sporting organisations participating, we are seeing more and more commitments to providing safer and more inclusive environments and experiences for LGBTIQ+ people,” he said.

“While inclusion has well and truly made its way onto the Australian workplace diversity and inclusion agenda, there is more to be done to ensure that sport in Australia can experience greater levels of LGBTIQ+ inclusion.”

The awards were produced by Pride in Sport, the national not-for-profit sporting inclusion program spearheaded by Australia’s largest LGBTIQ+ health organisation ACON.

See a full list of this year’s winners below.

Award Recipient
Highest Ranking Overall Melbourne University Sport and Tennis Australia
Highest Ranking State Sporting Organisation Cricket Victoria
Highest Ranking Professional Club St Kilda Football Club
LGBTI Ally Award David Kyle, North Gippsland Football & Netball League
LGBTI Inclusive Coach Aaron Lucas, Sydney Roller Derby League
LGBTI Community Sport Perth Pythons LGBTI+ Hockey Club
LGBTI Out Role Model Tony Boutoubia (Tennis)
LGBTI Inclusion Initiative LGBTIQA+ Women’s Water Polo Program (Sydney Stingers Water Polo)
Small Club Award Loton Park Tennis Club

© Star Observer 2019 | For the latest in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) news in Australia, be sure to visit starobserver.com.au daily. You can also read our latest magazines or Join us on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.

Microsoft celebrates Pride, takes action for equity and visibility

 |   Chris Capossela – Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer

 

Fifty years ago, on June 28, LGBTQI+ patrons and allies at New York City’s Stonewall Inn stood up for justice demanding an equal life free of persecution. This year, as more than 4,000 Microsoft employees march in Pride parades in more than 60 cities and 30 countries around the world, we invite you to join us in pushing inclusion forward.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, we’re taking action for equity by donating to LGBTQI+ nonprofits. Plus, we’re releasing limited-edition products designed with and by the LGBTQI+ community.

 

YouTube Video

 

Microsoft has a history of LGBTQI+ inclusion

For us, Pride is an opportunity to reflect on our past and galvanize for action. We started our inclusion journey early in the company’s history, introducing sexual orientation in our non-discrimination policies in 1989. In 1993, we were one of the first companies in the world to offer employee benefits to same-sex domestic partners. In 2004, we added gender identity to our Equal Employment Opportunity statement and started providing gender affirming healthcare services. Since 2005, Microsoft has attained a top  score of 100 on the Human Rights Campaign Corporate Equality Index, which indicates that Microsoft is establishing and applying policies to protect the LGBTQI+ community.

Our journey is just beginning

Today, Microsoft operates in over 120 countries, most of which still don’t provide legal protections for LGBTQI+ individuals. This year, Microsoft’s Pride campaign is all about the actions that our employees and customers are taking to advance inclusion. GLEAM (Global LGBTQI+ Employees and Allies at Microsoft), our LGBTQI+ resource group, worked with many of our teams to develop products to create visibility into the LGBTQI+ community.

In designing this year’s Pride campaign, LGBTQI+ designers and allies at Microsoft reflected on the LGBTQI+ rights movement of the 1970s. Dozens of LGBTQI+ community members and their allies submitted designs for campaign buttons displaying everything from personal statements to political slogans. These buttons reflect actions that people at Microsoft are taking and are encouraging others to take.

Microsoft is releasing all the button designs as a downloadable archive so everyone can use them, add to them and share their Pride with everyone, wherever they are.

Several Pride-related buttons

For the first time, we’ve also created limited-edition products and curated content to show our continued support for the LGBTQI+ community.

  • Surface – Inspired by the rich and varied tapestry of the LGBTQI+ community, make a more colorful impact with the limited-edition Surface Pro Pride Type Cover and Pride Skin available in the US, Canada, Australia, and the U.K. (only Type Cover).

YouTube Video

  • Windows PrideWindows – This Windows 10 special-edition theme was inspired by the many LGBTQI+ flags. Download the Windows Pride theme pack from the Microsoft Store.
  • Mixer – Discover Pride on Mixer with dedicated streams from select partners, unique stickers, and exclusive programs. Tune in on June 30th to live stream the Seattle Pride Parade!
  • Bing – Learn more about Stonewall on Bing with uniquely curated content featuring LGBTQI+ Bing Prideactivismdating back to 1969 with this quiz. And see Pride take over the Bing homepage in select countries around the world.
  • Office – Show your Pride colors with the exclusive Office theme and unique Pride templates for PowerPoint.
  • Skype – Celebrate Pride with Skype’s new LGBTQI+ flag emoticons, stickers, and more.
  • Xbox – Show your colors and celebrate your love of gaming with the Xbox Pride Sphere Pin available at xbox.com.Xbox Pride
  • Microsoft Rewards – Support LGBTQI+ youth in crisis by donating to The Trevor Project in June, and we’ll match it. Not a Microsoft Rewards member? Join today and we’ll give you $1 free to donate.
  • Microsoft Store – Visit your local Microsoft Store to take part in a Pride celebration, march with us, or learn more at educational workshops, events, and other activities.

Actions speak louder than words!

We’re donating $100,000 to the following nonprofits in Australia, Canada, United Kingdom, and the United States to celebrate and support their work on LGBTQI+ equity:

  • Established in 1985, ACON is Australia’s largest health promotion organization specializing in HIV prevention, HIV support and LGBTQ health.
  • Egale works to improve the lives of LGBTQI2S people in Canada and to enhance the global response to LGBTQI2S issues. They do this by informing public policy, inspiring cultural change, and promoting human rights and inclusion.
  • Mermaids is the only U.K.-wide charity working to support transgender or gender non-conforming children, young people, and their families. Their goal is to create a world where gender-diverse children and young people can be themselves and thrive. Mermaids promotes education and awareness, and offers information, support, friendship and shared experiences to those in need.
  •  The Trevor Project is the world’s largest suicide prevention and crisis intervention organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning young people under 25.

We’re also happy to announce that LGBTQI+ nonprofit, Destination Tomorrow, was awarded a grant from the Microsoft Store to support their inclusion efforts for people of color. See what happened when we took action to help them thrive.

YouTube Video

We invite everyone to join us in taking action for equality. Microsoft Pride 2019 products launch today! Follow along with our stories all month and learn more about actions you can take for equality by joining the social conversation using #MicrosoftPride.

Pride in Sport Awards recognise athletes, clubs and organisations for LGBTQ inclusion

Cricket Victoria, Tennis Australia, Australian Football League (AFL) club St. Kilda and Melbourne University Sport are among other sporting organisations and individuals who have been named as Australia’s best for LGBTQ inclusion at the Australian Pride in Sport Awards held today at the Cargo Hall in Melbourne.

Launched last year, the Australian Pride in Sport Awards is the first celebration of its kind dedicated solely to recognising exceptional efforts in making sport more inclusive of LGBTQ people. It is produced by Pride in Sport, the national not-for-profit sporting inclusion program spearheaded by Australia’s largest LGBTQ health organisation, ACON.

Cricket Victoria was recognised as the Highest Ranking State Sporting Organisation, while the St. Kilda Football Club took home the award for the Highest Ranking Professional Club. Tennis Australia and Melbourne University Sport were the Highest Ranking Overall Award joint recipients.

Three individuals across various sporting codes were awarded for their efforts in making their respective sports more inclusive of LGBTQ people on and off the field, with three community awards also being handed out.

The awards showcase the results of the Pride in Sport Index (PSI) – a national benchmarking instrument used to asses LGBTQ inclusion within Australian sport.

ACON Vice-President and Co-Founder of the PSI, Andrew Purchas, said: “Despite significant recent gains in equality and law reform, the past year has shown that struggles continue to persist for LGBTQ people in Australia, including within the sporting sector”.

“These awards and the index continue to highlight the important inclusion work being done by many within Australian sport, as they provide sporting organisations and figures with an opportunity to reflect on their work in the inclusion of LGBTQ participants and staff, and identify areas they can address to ensure their sport is truly inclusive.

“Many of Australia’s sporting organisations are taking the positive steps needed to be taken to ensure your sexuality, gender identity and experience does not impact your ability to play, watch or be involved with sport at any level.

“I congratulate all the award recipients and the many others working towards making Australian sport an inclusive place for everyone and I’m proud to celebrate those success stories at the Pride in Sport Awards today,” Mr Purchas said.

The awards, hosted by NITV presenter Matty Webb, featured a host of leading sporting and community figures, including a keynote address from the first openly gay NRL referee Matt Cecchin, Australia’s first openly gay male soccer player Andy Brennan, and leading Australian cricketer and co-patron of Pride in Sport, Alex Blackwell.

This year’s PSI results saw a 61 per cent increase in index submissions, highlighting the focus sporting entities are beginning to put on LGBTQ inclusion within various codes. In addition, award nominations from the wider community also rose by 70 per cent, indicating that a far greater portion of the sporting community are achieving positive outcomes when they develop initiatives for inclusion at a grassroots level.

Program Manager for Pride in Sport Beau Newell said: “Since 2016, the Pride in Sport Index has continued to see a significant shift in practice with LGBTQ inclusion work in Australian sport. With a wide range of sporting organisations participating, we are seeing more and more commitments to providing safer and more inclusive environments and experiences for LGBTQ people”.

“While inclusion has well and truly made its way onto the Australian workplace diversity and inclusion agenda, there is more to be done to ensure that sport in Australia can experience greater levels of LGBTQ inclusion.

“I would like to congratulate each sport and the many volunteers on the efforts they are making to ensure everyone is welcome both on and off the sporting field,” Newell said.

 

2019 Pride in Sport Awards Recipients

 

Highest Ranking Overall

Melbourne University Sport and Tennis Australia

Highest Ranking State Sporting Organisation

Cricket Victoria

Highest Ranking Professional Club

St Kilda Football Club

LGBTI Ally Award

David Kyle, North Gippsland Football & Netball League

LGBTI Inclusive Coach

Aaron Lucas, Sydney Roller Derby League

LGBTI Community Sport

Perth Pythons LGBTI+ Hockey Club

LGBTI Out Role Model

Tony Boutoubia (Tennis)

LGBTI Inclusion Initiative

LGBTIQA+ Women’s Water Polo Program (Sydney Stingers Water Polo)

Small Club Award

Loton Park Tennis Club

 

TOP IMAGE: 2019 Pride in Sport Awards recipients for Highest Ranking Overall – Tennis Australia and Melbourne University Sport (Joint Winners). Pictured (from left): Pride in Sport Program Manager Beau Newell, Tennis Australia National Diversity and Inclusion Coordinator Irena Farinacci, Tennis Australia Head of Diversity Kerry Tabrou, Melbourne University Sport Pride and Diversity Coordinator Chris Bunting, Sport Australia CEO Kate Palmer and Pride in Sport Co-founder Andrew Purchas. Photo: Reg Domingo    

 

ABOUT PRIDE IN SPORT

Pride in Sport is a national not-for-profit program that assists sporting organisations and clubs with the inclusion of LGBTI employees, players, volunteers and spectators. It is part of ACON’s Pride Inclusion Programs, which provides a range of services to employers, sporting organisations and service providers with support in all aspects of LGBTI inclusion. All funds generated through membership and ticketed events go back into the work of Pride in Sport, actively working alongside sporting organisations, clubs and participants to make Australian sport inclusive of LGBTI communities. For more information, visit the Pride Inclusion Programs website here.

 

ABOUT THE PRIDE IN SPORT INDEX

The Pride in Sport Index (PSI) is an independently administered benchmarking system that provides the opportunity for all national and state sporting organisations to have their LGBTI related initiatives, programs and policies reviewed, measured and monitored. An initiative of the Australian Human Rights Commission, the Australian Sports Commission and a legacy of the Bingham Cup Sydney 2014 (the world cup of gay rugby), it was developed alongside an advisory group that includes representatives from the National Rugby League (NRL), the Australian Football League (AFL), the Australian Rugby Union (ARU), Football Federation Australia (FFA), Cricket Australia, Swimming Australia, Water Polo Australia, Basketball Australia and Golf Australia. For more information, visit the Pride in Sport website here.

Remarks at the Australia launch of the Global LGBTI Standards for Business

Remarks at the Australia launch of the Global LGBTI Standards for Business

#Biz4LGBTI Melbourne, December 5, 2017, Pride in Practice Conference

Kate Gilmore, United Nations Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights

Thank you, Anthony, for joining us and thanks to Baker McKenzie, which was one the very first supporters of these standards, and is kindly sponsoring tonight’s reception. Thank you Dawn and thank you ACON and Pride in Diversity for being such gracious hosts.

We have benefit of a wonderful backdrop to our meeting together, of course – the people of Australia just stood up decisively for universal human rights for all when to marriage equality they gave resounding endorsement.  The rights and wrongs of such postal surveys aside, the “Yes” campaign secured a decisive win for compassion, decency and human rights.

The 844 corporate campaign-YES supporters – many of whom are with us this afternoon – exemplified how the Australian private sector can and should play a positive and engaging role for universal rights.  The potential of such public leadership?  That’s what brings us here: not only how unacceptable it is to be silent in the face of discrimination, cruel and inexcusable, on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity and expression, but just how straightforward it is to stand up – influentially – against it.  Just a spoonful of universal values, a pinch of personal responsibility and a shed load of willingness to act – to respect, protect, empower and support.

Eradicating discrimination might appear to be a complicated business – but, it ain’t, while standing up for equality – that’s just good business – simply the business of doing good.

Friends,

The Australian Human Rights Commission tells us more than half of all transgender people and LGBTI youth have directly experienced abuse, including overt violence simply because of who they are; while almost half of all lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people are so concerned about the likely negative consequences of their identities on their employment, they feel compelled to hide who they are.

For this, and for them, marriage equality is no answer.  It’s just key.  One key – helping unlock that heavy and distorting door that stands in the way of our path to the fuller realisation of human rights for all.

On that journey, marriage equality is a major step.  But so many more steps are equally well overdue. Marriage equality doesn’t undo the myriad other forms that inequalities take. It doesn’t end the bullying.  It doesn’t silence the name calling, or bottle down the behind-your-back sniggering.  It doesn’t lower the fist, or end the exclusion, dismantle the bias, tear away toxicity, shore up acceptance or secure fair access to fair advance.

We invented this situation ourselves, of course – socially and culturally constructed and reconstructed a stratification of human beings into a perverse ranking according to synthetic typologies that are the fathers too of fear and fiction:   gender, age, disability, the color of my skin, the sound of your language, how I worship, whom you love.   Multiple forms of discrimination intertwine to bind the feet, gag the mouths and waste the talent of millions the world over.

Bitter is the fruit of these intersecting and diverse forms of discrimination. In conflict settings, and in peace time; in the context of migration and when at home, working for decent pay or labouring without just remuneration – in all settings, bigotry, xenophobia and discrimination are just repugnant.

Yet no child anywhere at any time ever emerged into this world with bigotries preordained, ready to go – pret a manger.  Frankly, the human rights violations that drive vicious cycles of marginalization and exclusion have no place on a planet of peace and prosperity.

And in our interconnected, interdependent world, it is a fallacy that are walls, borders or fences that erode our obligations to each others’ rights.  There is no wall so high, nor border so patrolled; no special identity nor personal privilege so rarefied; no surveillance system nor unmanned drone; no enmity so heartfelt nor friendship so rare, that, on this dormitory planet, can put between you and me such a distance that your rights do not count with me; that my rights do not matter to you; that their rights do not register with us.  No such distance exists, except, that is, as is fabricated in fantasist, sinister, popularist ideologies whose nihilism feeds off and manufactures desperation, despair and disillusion.

Walls within the human family, on a small, distressed planet in a globalized world, home to the largest population of youngest people in all of human history?  Walls are untruths. The world’s future will not become sustainable when its fruits are reserved for some and never enjoyed by all; when its social and economic systems reproduce societies stratified not by effort, contribution or creativity but by the dumb luck of where you are born, how you look, whom you identify as and whom you love.

And, how can it be that consenting sexual intimacy, personal regard and mutual affection should attract widespread contempt while bigotry, prejudice and cynical self-interest it seems can be elected even to the highest office in many lands?  How come we are so reluctant to call out hate – in all its forms – and yet so ready to outlaw love?

Laws in twenty countries across Asia-Pacific (12 in Asia, eight in the Pacific) still criminalize same sex couples: an attack on the fundamental rights of LGBTI people, those legal frameworks dehumanize, erode equality, foster fear and, incidentally, are just bad for business.  That may be rule by law but it is not the rule of law – not when the foundational principle of equality before the law is violated.  Identity cannot be rightly criminalized.  Wrongful laws should be.  And until then, they should be opposed.

Friends,

Power comes in many varieties – the capacity to force people to do want they don’t want to; the ability to stop them doing what they want and the power to shape what they want and don’t want to do.[1] The state has unique responsibilities for limited and legitimate exercise of the powers of enforcement and prevention but in regard to the third?  The power to shape what we think we want, what we imagine we need?  In the exercise of that particular power, the commercial sector has become omnipresent.  Here lies the power of the market and there lies market shaping.  Desire, longing and wish fulfilment – these are the engine rooms of the consumption choices on which so much of commerce depends.

Like all powers, the privileges of profit seeking come with responsibilities.  Business can help make us hate each other, but must not.  Business can leave contempt unchallenged but should not.  Businesses should help make love matter more, but too many do not.  The world suffers not merely by the actions of the bad but thanks also to the silence of the better. From these duties to resist hate, to reject intolerance and to promote mutual respect there is nowhere to hide.

As businesses and corporations, if ever – with respect to equality on sexual orientation and gender identity – we are silent, then let it be only because we are listening to LGBTI people themselves and preparing then, on that basis, to … stand up to speak out.

That’s the core and more messages of the UN Human Rights Office global standards of conduct for business we are presenting today.  Designed to help companies the world claim, celebrate and contribute what they can, what they must offer to the tackling of discrimination against LGBTI people in the workplace and beyond.  Building on the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, founded on the fundamental truth that we all are born equal in dignity and rights –  these standards are the product of more than a year of consultation with hundreds of businesses all over the world – big, small, local, multi-national.

Five small-to-take steps that mean – as individual employers, suppliers, retailers and corporate citizens – any company can take a giant step to help end discrimination and promote equality in the workplace, in the marketplace and in the broader community:

  1. RESPECT the rights of LGBTI people in the way you run your business – set up effective policies, deploy due diligence and put effective grievance mechanisms in place;
  2. ELIMINATE discrimination against LGBTI employees in the workplace – sensitize staff and managers, equalize benefits, and eliminate discrimination from hiring and workplace practices;
  3. SUPPORT your LGBTI employees at work – by create an affirming, inclusive environment for LGBTI employees, and supporte LGBTI staff groups;
  4. PREVENT discrimination and related violations against LGBTI suppliers, distributors or customers – and use leverage to insist that business partners uphold equality;
  5. ACT in the public domain – stand up for LGBTI people in all the countries everywhere you do business.

How this operates will vary, of course, depending on the context.  But irrespective of local laws that may violate human rights or of local political dynamics that seek to spread bigotry further, in partnership with LGBTI people and civil society advocates – in every context, companies can and should stand up: take bold steps to shield LGBTI people from unfair treatment within the workplace and take courageous steps to promote their rights beyond the workplace.

Most recently Mastercard, Twitter, Ben & Jerry, Intel, Aviva, Adidas, Fidelity International, McKinsey, Ralph Lauren Corp., RELX Group, Westpac and Williams-Sonoma Inc., among others, have joined the early supporters of the Standards. That makes a total of 36 companies that expressed support since we first unveiled the Standards in New York at the end of September. Between them, these companies represent more than 3 million employees and a trillion U.S. dollars in revenues.  There is as yet only one Australian company on the list – WESTPAC. Let’s swell those number now.

Friends,

The rights of LGBTI people matter and not merely in the bedroom. Their rights like your rights are my rights – and our rights also pertain and persist from the courtroom to the boardroom to the workroom to the schoolroom to the bathroom and into the bedroom.

In an age of scarcity, at a time of austerity, if we are to want not, then we must waste not.  We must not continue to waste precious human talent or erode essential human dignity – neither through bigotry nor exclusion; nor by neglect or design.  Rights?  Rights are for the best and worst of us, to the exclusion of none of us, for the sake of each of us and in the interests of all us.


[1] With credit to political philosopher, Stephen Lukes, who identified these three varieties but framed the third a little differently.

Queer Thinking – Going Rainbow Is More Than Just Lip Service

Join us on Sydney’s beautiful Harbour for a lively conversation with five of the Mardi Gras’ key partners and Pride in Diversity, Australia’s National Employer Support Program for LGBTI workplace inclusion.

Pride in Diversity’s Lin Surch moderates a panel discussion to explore some of the work being achieved by members of Pride in Diversity in LGBTI workplace inclusion, and in the community. Spanning a range of industry sectors, our panelists will engage in some robust discussion exploring the impact of community engagement on employees, customers and clients.

Are organisations truly walking the walk, or is going rainbow just plain Lip Service?

The panelists will share their experiences, organisational insight, and inspirational stories. We invite you to submit any questions you might like answered when you RSVP or at any time prior to the event by email to lin.surch@prideindiversity.com.au

Moderator:

Lin Surch (Pride in Diversity)

Panelists:

  • ANZ (Melissa Tandy)
  • Canon (Kirsty Beed)
  • Facebook (Mia Garlick)
  • Brown-Forman (Shelly Silberman)
  • Minter Ellison (Gordon Williams)

Event Details

Friday, February 26, 2016
4:00pm – 5:30pm
The Harbour,
Fleet Steps Road, Sydney, 2000
Bookings: FREE (Registration essential via the link below)

http://www.mardigras.org.au/2016-festival-event-guide/qt-mardi-gras-partners

 


Wet Weather Contingency

In the event of rain, all registered patrons will be contacted by email 2 hours prior to the event and the panel will take place at the Eternity Playhouse, 39 Burton Street Darlinghurst NSW 2010.

MARDI GRAS FILM FESTIVAL 2016

Pride in Diversity and ACON are proud supporters of the Mardi Gras Film Festival, presented by QueerScreen, which starts two weeks from today, Feb 18 – Mar 3.
Full program here

Here are just some of the highlights:

FEATURE FILMS

That's not us 1

  • THAT’S NOT US
    Three couples – one gay, one lesbian, one straight – on a weekend away at a beach house.
  • THE LADY IN THE VAN
    Dame Maggie Smith stars in The Lady In The Van and is a perfect British comedy.
  • JESS & JAMES
    If you love Latin America, join Jess & James on a very fun road trip across Argentina.

DOCUMENTARIES

In-bed-with-Madonna

  • IN BED WITH MADONNA
    Join us for the 25th anniversary screening of In Bed With Madonna, an unmissable outdoor screening.
  • WAITNG FOR B
    Fans of Beyonce must see Waiting For B, a perfect doco set in Brazil, about a group of LGBTIQ youth, who camp outside her concert for two months, to get the best seats.
  • REMEMBERING THE MAN
    HOLDING THE MAN fans, will love Remembering The Man, the documentary on the real people in the book and film.

FOCUS ON SPORT

Scrum 01

  • BACK ON BOARD: GREG LOUGANIS
    Don’t miss the Australian Premiere of BACK ON BOARD: GREG LOUGANIS, a HBO documentary celebrating the life of the multiple Olympic gold medallist.
  • GAME FACE
    An audience award winner at many festivals Game Face follows the one and only transgender lesbian MMA fighter Fallon Fox.
  • SCRUM
    Closer to home, the international hit SCRUM highlights the talent of the Sydney Convicts Rugby Club at the recent Bingham Cup.
  • OUT TO WIN
    Out To Win chronicles the history of out sports stars and features high-profile athletes such as Billie Jean King and Martina Navratilova.

Full program here

Sapphire event shines light on LBT Women in the Workplace

Sapphire event shines light on LBT Women in the Workplace

A panel of inspirational and “out” female role models, spoke openly about their personal experiences and challenges in the workplace and the community as part of Pride in Diversity’s Sapphire event hosted by Clayton Utz Brisbane.

Spanning three generations, the panellists – University of Sunshine Coast Head of the Student Access, Equity and Diversity and Pinnacle Foundation Board Member, Dr Ann Stewart, CU Perth senior associate, Liz Humphry, and Barrister and President of Queensland Young Lawyers, Florence Chen – each shared their own unique “coming out” journeys and spoke candidly on a range of topics including role modelling and parenting.  Lin Surch from Pride in Diversity facilitated the fascinating discussion.

Read the full story here.